For the past eighteen months, the Tech.eu team has been meticulously keeping track of funding and M&A activity across Europe (including Israel, Turkey, Russia, the Balkans, Norway, Switzerland and other countries we consider part of the European technology industry).

This is a challenging task, as it involves continuously monitoring numerous sources, in a wide variety of languages, for an industry that is almost as widely fragmented as the European continent itself.

It’s also a rewarding task, because it enables us to collect data and intelligence pertaining to the European technology industry at a scale no one has been able to do in the past. That, in turn, allows us to analyse more and better data about financing, mergers, acquisitions, IPOs and technology trends in Europe than ever before.

To date, we’ve collected this intelligence and sent heaps of curated information to thousands of newsletter subscribers located across the globe on a weekly basis, and we’ve published a number of reports on funding and quarterly M&A activity on the Tech.eu website in the past.

The next step is bringing data and intelligence together, by analysing the information that we’ve monitored and gathered in the past year and a half, and connecting the proverbial dots. This has resulted in our first paid report, a comprehensive review of all the M&A and IPO activity from European technology companies that we’ve managed to track in 2014.

You can also jump straight to our post on the main take-aways from the report.

Tech.eu European Tech Exits Report 2014 Key Takeaways

For people who have a vested, professional interest in what happens in Europe when it comes to innovation and technology entrepreneurship, the full report offers indispensable information and invaluable insights that will help them understand the European tech industry on a much higher level.

You can buy the full report online here; the price is £1,200 (roughly €1,660 or $1,850).

What you can expect from the first “Tech.eu European Tech Exits Report” for 2014:

– the number of exits (M&A transactions + IPOs) tracked by Tech.eu throughout 2014
– a breakdown of which transaction types was most prevalent
– a look at the total and average size for all disclosed exit deals
– insights into how many exits were disclosed
– a breakdown of which vertical (‘E-commerce’, ‘Enterprise Saas’, etc.) delivered the best returns
– insights into how many of the exited companies were backed by venture capital
– a breakdown of which exited companies focused on a B2C vs. B2B model
– insights into where and when most M&A activity in Europe took place
– an analysis of which investors were behind the most successful European tech company exits
– a breakdown of which companies were most active in buying European tech companies
– insights into where buyers of European tech companies were located
– a closer look at some of the largest markets in Europe (Israel, France, UK, Germany and Spain)
– future trends and expectations in European tech M&A and IPO activity

Thanks for the interest and don’t forget to subscribe to our newsletter! And please spread the word. 😉

Update – some of the coverage out there:

Report: Google was top buyer of European tech companies in 2014 (Venturebeat)

One statistic proves how far the European tech scene is lagging behind the US (Business Insider)

Report: Europe had 358 exits in 2014. Is that good or bad? (Geektime)

Companies originating from the Nordics accounted for 25% of Europe’s 20 largest tech exits in 2014 (The Nordic Web)

“Google acquired the most European tech companies in 2014 (8), followed by Microsoft, Yandex and Facebook” (Tech Editor, EMEA for The Wall Street Journal)

HomepageBanner

  • Hi @robinwauters hope edocr was included in the list of non vc-backed UK exits

    • It absolutely was not. Because this is a report for 2014 :)

  • Sidar Ok

    Great write up. Does the report have the details of for every single exit, one by one, detailed information or is it more accumulated info?

    • Hey Sidar, the report is an analysis of accumulated data, we do a breakdown for certain countries but don’t focus on individual exits. The raw data in itself isn’t as interesting as the insights gained from them, we think :)