In an effort to connect non-job seekers with new employment opportunities and employers who want a competitive edge in today’s talent acquisition market, Helskini-based Jobilla has raised €2.16 million.

The funding round was led by Trind VC, and €700,000 of the investment arrives via loans and government grants. Jobilla is reporting that the funding will be used to further develop its AI-driven candidate filtering software as well as drive expansion efforts into Germany, Austria, and the Netherlands, and scale up operations in the U.S.

“With over 20 years of experience in the recruitment industry, we identified Jobilla’s approach to solving the shortage of available top talent was different to any other company that we’ve seen,” comments Trind VC partner Kimmo Irpola.

Founded in 2015, Jobilla is aiming to stake its claim in a €450 billion industry, often plagued by complicated and/or not-so-user-friendly software packages.

“We saw an increasing number of companies struggling to find good candidates for their vacancies and that traditional recruitment software didn’t offer any working solutions to solve these problems. So we built a tool that doesn’t just help our clients to manage their recruiting, but helps them solve their most difficult recruitment needs with innovative digital marketing methods,” comments Jobilla co-founder and CEO Henri Nordström.

In a “traditional” recruitment world, job postings only reach those that are actively looking for a new gig, with “up to 85% of suitable candidates unaware of new career opportunities but 52% would be open to switching jobs if the right position was presented to them,” explains Nordström.

Jobilla counts RE/MAX, the German Red Cross, and Securitas as clients and has seen a 106% growth in sales over the past 12 months.

“Jobilla has developed a fresh and crisp new tool which convincingly deviates from the struggles of previous recruiting methods, adding new and modern ways of reaching and finding talent, and performs particularly well with recruiting people who weren’t actively looking to change jobs,” adds German Red Cross CEO Rainer Oetting.

Comments are closed.