London’s all-in-one Hashimoto support app Hashiona has raised €450,000 in pre-seed funding from Draper University, KAYA, DFRI, Calm/Storm, and angel investors Slawek Szymankiewicz, Pawel Wozniak, and Daniel Świątkowski

Hashimoto is a condition where the immune system attacks the thyroid, the main production house of hormones that coordinate a large number of the body’s functions. In the US, levothyroxine (an underactive thyroid gland treatment) is the second most prescribed medicine and within the top 5 in the EU. According to the American Thyroid Association, up to 12% of the population will develop thyroid-related problems during their lifetime

“The scale of this global healthcare disorder is significant.  Many seemingly healthy people around us are struggling with thyroid diseases,” comments Draper University CEO Andy Tang. “Hashiona has a cost-effective, elegant and innovative approach to improve the well-being of patients.”

Founded in early 2020 and quietly launched in January of 2021, Hashiona has seen decent traction, reporting “hundreds of beta users”. The app provides users with self-tracking tools & connects them with clinicians worldwide via telemedicine. 

Using patients’ data and AI, the app provides insight into user-specific health conditions and allows for the discovery of individual health patterns. Users get suggestions on what lifestyle habits & supplements they should change to get them back on track and regain their life balance by keeping their symptoms under control.

Apart from the app itself, Hashiona also has plans to provide patients with a step-by-step programme that aims to see them in remission. This 12 to 14 week programme can be individually tailored to each user through a combination of medical records and the user’s lifestyle.

‘What lies behind Hashiona’s unique and compelling recipe is its holistic approach towards Hashimoto’s disease – an autoimmune thyroid disorder which can be controlled, but can hardly be cured,” adds Calm/Storm founder and managing partner Michael Ströck. “The current gap in access to endocrinologists paired with a growing number of people affected pushes for digitalization of the treatment.”

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